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Patawomeck Band Memorial Park 
& Widewater State Park

Patawomeck Band Memorial Park

Chief "Bootsie" Bullock described the park as a beautiful place to visit. "The meditation wheel was a great place to reflect" or take a hike to the Summit. "Stand where our ancestors stood! Take time to reflect that once upon a time only the Creator, the Patawomeck and the wildlife were the only things there!"

It is located a quarter of a mile before the end of Brooke Road. Before you enter Aquia Landing Park, it is on the right side. If you get to Aquia Landing gate, turn around and go back a quarter of a mile and it's on your left.

LOCATION

2803-2801

CO Rd 608

Stafford, Virginia 22554

Park Hours:

April 1-October 31

from 8:00am -8:00pm

November 1- March 31

from 8:00am-5:30pm

Rules and Regulations For Patawomeck Band Park

No camping

No fires

No ATV's or off road vehicles

No Mountain bike riding

No horseback riding

No hunting or trapping

No alcoholic beverages

Possession and or use of drugs is prohibited

No relic hunting

No EVENTS are to be held without prior approval of Tribal Council

NO TRESPASSING AFTER DARK

DONATIONS

Patawomeck Tribe

Village Sign

Before leaving the area, check out the Patawomeck Tribe Village Sign at Aquia Landing. It is located near the end of Brooke Rd before you enter Aquia Landing Park. It will be on the right side.

 

To be a part of the Patawomeck Indian Tribe of Virginia's future, consider donating.

We appreciate your support!

For more information on how you can make a difference, check out our donation page.

Widewater State Park

LOCATION

101 Widewater State Park Rd

Stafford, Virginia 22554

Park Hours:

Open from 8:00am - dusk

Visitor Center is open

Monday - Friday

from 8:00am-4:00pm

and restrooms are open.

Patawomeck Village at Widewater State Park

The opening ceremony for the Patawomeck Village at Widewater State Park took place June 22, 2019.

The Tribe is building a 60x15 foot long house for the Patawomeck Village that will be erected. 

The construction of the long house will be built in the same manner as it would have been built by our ancestors. Before the wood can be used for the structure, the bark is stripped off the cedar saplings with hand tools. The saplings are connected by wire and bent between metal poles for several weeks. This method will ensure the saplings remain strong and rounded.

At the opening ceremony, the Tribe was presented with a check for $6,000 as a gift from the park, to help pay for the expensive, but necessary bark siding. This generous gift was presented to the Tribe by Kirstina Monroe-Lowe, the park's chief ranger for visitor experience.

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Brad Hatch demonstrated fabricating of the Patawomeck eel pot. During the process of making an eel pot, the tree must first be cut down. Then the wood is split, ribs are shaped, and the pieces are woven together.

Scott Gray's strong but steady beats on the drum compliment the light, airy notes of Laura Lee Harding's flute while Ruby Harding shows off her dance skills.

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Dee Harding and Gordon Silver demonstrated the throwing of the Adl Adl.

Gary Cooper, Scott and Heather Gray manned the booth dedicated to promoting the Patawomeck Language Class.

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To be a part of the Patawomeck Indian Tribe of Virginia's future, consider donating.

We appreciate your support!

For more information on how you can make a difference, check out our donation page.

DONATE
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